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Journal of Advanced Ceramics  2015, Vol. 4 Issue (2): 152-157    doi: 10.1007/s40145-015-0148-y
Research Article     
Gas sensing capabilities of TiO2 porous nanoceramics prepared through premature sintering
Yao XIONGa,Zilong TANGb,Yu WANGc,Yongming HUd,Haoshuang GUd,Yuanzhi LIe,Helen Lai Wah CHANc,Wanping CHENa*
aKey Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
bSchool of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
cDepartment of Applied Physics and Materials Research Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
dFaculty of Physics and Electronic Technology, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062, China
eState Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
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Abstract  

Pure and noble metal (Pt, Pd, and Au) doped TiO2 nanoceramics have been prepared from TiO2 nanoparticles through traditional pressing and sintering. For those samples sintered at 550 ℃, a typical premature sintering occurred, which led to the formation of a highly porous microstructure with a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) specific surface area of 23 m2/g. At room temperature, only Pt-doped samples showed obvious response to hydrogen, with sensitivities as high as ~500 for 1000 ppm H2 in N2; at 300 ℃, all samples showed obvious responses to CO, while the responses of noble metal doped samples were much higher than that of the undoped ones. The mechanism for the observed sensing capabilities has been discussed, in which the catalytic effect of Pt for hydrogen is believed responsible for the room-temperature hydrogen sensing capabilities, and the absence of glass frit as commonly used in commercial thick-film metal oxide gas sensors is related to the high sensitivities. It is proposed that much attention should be paid to metal oxide porous nanoceramics in developing gas sensors with high sensitivities and low working temperatures.



Key wordsTiO2      porous nanoceramics      premature sintering      sensors      hydrogen      CO     
Received: 08 May 2015      Published: 15 April 2015
Corresponding Authors: Wanping CHEN   
Cite this article:

Yao XIONG,Zilong TANG,Yu WANG,Yongming HU,Haoshuang GU,Yuanzhi LI,Helen Lai Wah CHAN,Wanping CHEN. Gas sensing capabilities of TiO2 porous nanoceramics prepared through premature sintering. Journal of Advanced Ceramics, 2015, 4(2): 152-157.

URL:

http://jac.tsinghuajournals.com/10.1007/s40145-015-0148-y     OR     http://jac.tsinghuajournals.com/Y2015/V4/I2/152

Fig. 1 XRD patterns taken on the surfaces of TiO2 nanoceramics sintered at 550 ℃: (a) undoped, A: anatase, R: rutile; (b) Pd-doped; (c) Au-doped; and (d) Pt-doped.
Fig. 2 SEM micrograph taken on a fractured surface of undoped TiO2 nanoceramics sintered at 550 ℃.
Fig. 3 N2 adsorptiondesorption isotherms measured at 77 K for undoped TiO2 nanoceramics sintered at 550 ℃.
Fig. 4 Pore size distribution for undoped TiO2 nanoceramics sintered at 550 ℃ calculated by desorption isotherm.
Fig. 5 Room-temperature responses to 1000 ppm H2 of sensors based on undoped, Pd-doped, Pt-doped, and Au-doped TiO2 nanoceramics sintered at 550 ℃.
Fig. 6 Room-temperature responses of Pt-doped TiO2 nanoceramics sintered at 550 ℃ to 1000 ppm H2 and air, respectively.
Fig. 7 Responses to 700 ppm CO at 300 ℃ of sensors based on undoped, Pt-doped, Au-doped, and Pd-doped TiO2 nanoceramics sintered at 550 ℃.
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